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Motor-assisted scooter ordinance went into effect May 24, 2004. 

A person 12 years of age or older who does not hold a valid drivers license must have a Richardson Police Department issued “scooter permit”.

The permit must be carried on person while operating the scooter.

To receive a scooter permit you must view a safety education video and pass a written test.

A person 12 years of age or older may ride on a public roadway not wider than 27 feet with a maximum speed limit of 30 MPH.

A person 12 years of age or older may cross an intersection where the cross street has a speed limit greater than 30 MPH. (ex… Yale Blvd at Arapaho Rd.)

A gas-powered scooter may not exceed 40cc engine displacement.

A person under 12 years of age may only ride on public sidewalks.

A person under 12 years of age is not required to hold a city issued scooter permit.

A State or Federal approved helmet must be worn while operating a motor-assisted scooter. Bicycle helmet preferred.

At this time there are no trails in Richardson where a motor-assisted scooter may be ridden. A scooter may not be ridden in city parks.

Any violation of this ordinance or related city ordinances could result in a suspension of your scooter permit and/or a maximum $200.00 fine.

The video and test will be available at the Richardson Police Department.

Questions can be directed to the department spokesperson at 972-744-4997.

Government Use Only: The City of Richardson's Motorized Scooter Safety video is now available as a DVD. For more information and the order form, click here.

       Classes:

Classes will be held every Wednesday at 4:00 p.m. by appointment only (call 972-744-4955 by 4 p.m. on Thursday before the following Wednesday class).

There will also be a class on the second Saturday of the month at 10:00 a.m. by appointment only (call 972-744-4955 by 4:00 p.m. on the second Thursday of the month).

Classes will not be held on holidays or holiday week-ends.

Students must pass a written examination.

Class will last approximately 45 - 60 minutes.

The classes will be held at the Richardson Police Department 140 N. Greenville Avenue.

Class seating is limited and is on a first come first serve basis.

The class is free.
 Legal Information about Motorized Scooters:

Neighborhood Electric Vehicle and Motor Assisted Scooter Information
The 78th Legislature addressed the issue of new transportation technology. The law now recognizes motor assisted scooters and Neighborhood Electric Vehicles for limited street usage. The law can be found in the Texas Transportation Code (TRC) as Subchapter D, Sections 551.301 and 551.302. Subchapter D became effective on September 1, 2003.

In general, any traffic law which applies to bicycles also applies to motor assisted scooters. That means the operator must obey the usual traffic laws that bicycle operators must obey such as speed limit, signal turns, etc. (TRC 551.101(a)). However, TRC 551.302(d) states that some laws that apply to a motor vehicle do not apply to these scooters. This means that:

• the scooter operator doesn't need a driver license,
• the scooter operator doesn't need liability insurance,
• the scooter doesn't have to be registered or have a license plate,
• the scooter doesn't have to carry a low speed vehicle emblem; and,
• the scooter doesn't have to be inspected.
Cities and counties may prohibit operation of these scooters on particular streets or highways for safety reasons, as can the Texas Department of Transportation (TXDOT).

Along with the "motor assisted scooter," the Legislature legalized the "neighborhood electric vehicle." The "neighborhood electric vehicle" is any vehicle subject to Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 500. They generally resemble a golf cart, but are larger-usually capable of carrying four passengers-with a top speed between 20 M.P.H. and 25 M.P.H. Vehicles such as the John Deere Gator and Kawasaki Mule are not neighborhood electric vehicles because they are not subject to Federal Standard 500 in that they are designed to primarily carry cargo rather than passengers. Like the motor assisted scooter, neighborhood electric vehicles can be driven on any street or highway with a posted speed limit of 35 M.P.H. or less, and may cross streets or highways with a higher posted speed limit. However, unlike the motor assisted scooter, a neighborhood electric vehicle must be registered and have a license plate. The operator must have a driver license and the vehicle or operator must be covered with the required liability insurance or acceptable substitute. In addition, these vehicles meet the TRC Section 547.001 definition of a "slow moving vehicle," and must carry a low speed vehicle emblem. Finally, as with the motor assisted scooter, a city or county may prohibit their operation on a street or highway for safety reasons, as can TXDOT.

Texas Transportation Code Subchapter D

551.301. Definitions.

In this subchapter:

1."Neighborhood electric vehicle" means a vehicle subject to Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 500 (49 C.F.R. Section 571.500).

2."Motor assisted scooter" means a self-propelled device with: 
    a. at least two wheels in contact with the ground during operation; 
    b. a braking system capable of stopping the device under typical operating conditions; 
    c. a gas or electric motor not exceeding 40 cubic centimeters; 
    d. a deck designed to allow a person to stand or sit while operating the device; and 
    e. the ability to be propelled by human power alone.

551.302. Operation on Roadway. 

    a. A neighborhood electric vehicle or motor assisted scooter may be operated only on a street or highway for which the posted speed limit is 35 miles per hour or less. The vehicle may cross a road or street at an intersection where the road or street has a posted speed limit of more than 35 miles per hour. 
    b. A person may operate a motor assisted scooter on a path set aside for the exclusive operation of bicycles or on a sidewalk. Except as otherwise provided by this section, a provision of this title applicable to the operation of a bicycle applies to the operation of a motor assisted scooter. 
    c. A county or municipality may prohibit the operation of a neighborhood electric vehicle or motor assisted scooter on any street or highway if the governing body of the county or municipality determines that the prohibition is necessary in the interest of safety. 
    d. The department may prohibit the operation of a neighborhood electric vehicle or motor assisted scooter on a highway if it determines that the prohibition is necessary in the interest of safety. 
    e. A provision of this title applicable to a motor vehicle does not apply to a motor assisted scooter.

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Last updated: 3/21/2012 10:56:00 AM